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OVER 75 YEARS OF REPLOGLE:
Globes have Gravity!

Browse our Replogle Globes

1. About Replogle
2. A Word About Cartography
3. Glossary
4. Why is a globe tilted?
5. How can I find a place on a globe? How do I use latitude and longitude to find a place?
6. What's the difference between antique and blue ocean globes?
7. How many different maps are used?
8. There is a little round dial at the North Pole. What is it for?
9. What is the purpose of the metal ring or semi-ring around some globes?
10. Which place names are used on the globes?
11. There is sometimes a raised relief feature. I want to know more.
12. Why should I get a globe instead of an atlas?
13. Are the globe maps up to date?
14. How do I use the compass rose on the map?
15. How do I clean my globe?
16. I have a Replogle illuminated globe and I need to replace the light bulb.
17. On the gemstone globes, which stones are used?
18. Can I use push pins with my press craft globe?
19. My globe ball does not stay upright. How can I fix this?
20. How do I use the “Touch On” feature on my Replogle illuminated globe (20” or 32”)?
21. How can I find out if my globe is an antique and how much it is worth?
22. I heard about the Updatable Globe Program. What is it?
23. I have an old globe that is worn out. Can I get a replacement globe ball or stand?

Browse our Replogle Globes

 


1. About Replogle

Replogle, since 1930, has a dedicated cartography staff that is in constant contact with the U.S. State Department and other mapping authorities so that the globes incorporate the most accurate maps.

An unparalleled variety of sizes, designs, finishes and price points to satisfy every preference.

Many of Replogle globes are still painstakingly hand-made by artisans who have spent the better part of their lives with the company. This is indicative of a commitment to quality, a commitment to doing things the right way, a commitment to the globe itself.

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2. A Word About Cartography

The maps on all Replogle Globes show: nations and colonies, possessions, boundaries and place names, as officially approved by the United States Government. Maintenance of the content of the maps needs frequent communication with: the U.S. Department of State, the U.S. Board of Geographic Names, and the National Imagery and Mapping Agency.

In addition to the sources listed above, Replogle communicates with embassies of other nations in Washington D.C. and foreign consulate offices in Chicago, for help with new changes in boundaries and names.

Also used is some material from official foreign place-name agencies equivalent to the U.S. sources.

In some regions you will find notes about political claims by neighboring nations, but the land color (and border) is shown in accordance with the region's actual political affiliation or status. Similarly, alternative or former place names are often shown in parentheses.

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3. Glossary

 

Equator: Imaginary line running east and west around the exact middle of the earth.

Prime Meridian: Imaginary line running from pole to pole and passing through Greenwich, England, home of the Royal Greenwich Observatory.

Zero Point: The equator and the prime meridian intersect at point “0”. This is where all numbering starts for longitude and latitude lines.

Latitude: Imaginary lines running around the globe parallel to the equator at 10- or 15-degree increments.

Longitude: Imaginary lines running from pole to pole numbered in 15-degree increments from the Prime Meridian.

23.5 Degrees: The angle of the Earth’s tilt as it flies through space. Most Replogle globes are made to reflect this angle.

Meridian: A full- or semi-circle metal arc used to hold the globe in place. Meridians are generally numbered in degrees from 0° at the equator to 90° at either pole.

Time Dial: If it is noon where you are, turn the time dial so that noon faces your global location. The other numbers on the dial show the time in the rest of the world.

45°N, 73 °W: Locations are identified on a globe by the point where the longitude and the latitude lines intersect. 45° North, 73 ° West, for instance, is MuseoDeco, in Montreal.

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4. Why is a globe tilted?

The Earth is actually tilted at an angle of 23.5º in relationship to the Sun. Incidentally, this tilting gives us more or less daylight hours at certain times of the year and also causes the seasons to change.

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5. How can I find a place on a globe? How do I use latitude and longitude to find a place?

The equator and the prime meridian are two imaginary reference lines. We can determine all distances and locations using these reference lines. The intersection of the equator and the prime meridian is point "0" and longitude and latitude lines establish the distance from this point. The intersection of given latitude and longitude identifies a location (a place on the globe).

For example, Montreal is located 45º north (latitude) 73º west (longitude).

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6. What's the difference between antique and blue ocean globes?

Antique (or beige colored) globes resemble ancient parchment. They have an “Old World” appearance, which is popular for home decor or office settings. The antique appearance is only for esthetic appeal. The geographic information is up-to-date.

Blue-Ocean globes usually feature highly colorful and contrasting political boundaries. Young people usually prefers these globes, which appear more realistic.

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7. How many different maps are used?

Because globe models vary in sizes, languages and styles, over 100 different maps are used on Replogle globes.

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8. There is a little round dial at the North Pole. What is it for?

This is used to compare time around the world and is called a time dial.

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9. What is the purpose of the metal ring or semi-ring around some globes?

The metal ring (either full or half circle) is called a meridian. Normally, meridians are numbered (in degrees) from 0º to 90º (0º at the equator and 90º at either pole) and give the latitude for a place. Meridians were originally used to find locations on the globe.

Since Replogle globes maps feature longitude and latitude lines, the numbers on the meridian are now less important. The meridian ring purpose is now to hold the globe ball in its tilted position.

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10. Which place names are used on the globes?

Depending on the globe diameter and other space limitations, you will find more or less place names on the globe. Replogle attempts to list every nations and their capitals, then the largest or most important city or cities. Because there is more room, you can usually find more place names along the coastlines.

For place names outside North America, instead of using literal translation, Replogle maps also use what is called "conventional" names. These names are much easier to understand. For example, the maps will show Finland, not Suomi!

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11. There is sometimes a raised relief feature. I want to know more.

The purpose of raised relief is to emphasize the mountainous areas. You can easily see (and feel) the mountains. The relief on the globes does not relate to the true heights of the mountain ranges.

You will find raised relief on non-illuminated press craft globes (9", 12", 16") and on vinyl globes (12" and 16"). Smaller globes will not have raised relief because it is too difficult to accurately depict the mountainous areas. For very large globes (20" and 32"), the manufacturing process does not allow incorporating this feature.

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12. Why should I get a globe instead of an atlas?

Well, both an atlas and a globe are great references and teaching tools. When used together, each complements the other. Globes are very attractive and decorative for your home and your office and also show the world in its entirety, with land masses, countries and other areas in true proportion.

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13. Are the globe maps up to date?

A map is updated every time it is printed. When the U.S. State Department, along with representatives such as the embassies of the governments involved, recognizes that the changes are factual, Replogle implements these changes into their system.

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14. How do I use the compass rose on the map?

Older maps used the compass rose to indicate wind direction and intensity for different areas of the world. Replogle places a compass rose on many maps because it is beautiful, decorative and useful.

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15. How do I clean my globe?

  • For non-illuminated globes and for globes having a hand-applied map: remove dust and markings with a dry cloth.
  • For illuminated globes: remove dust with a dry cloth. For fingerprints or smudges, you can occasionnally use a very slightly dampened cloth.
  • Never use industrial or household cleaners that contain any solvent or alcohol.
  • To preserve the colors of your globe map, try to minimize exposure to direct sunlight.

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16. I have a Replogle illuminated globe and I need to replace the light bulb.

You can find replacement bulbs at any hardware or lighting store. Some illuminated globes use a standard light bulb, while others use a 15 watt up to 25 watt candelabra light bulb. Please follow these guidelines:

  • For a 12" globe, do not use more than a 15 or 25 watt bulb
  • For a 20" globe, use a 40 watt bulb
  • For a 32" globe, use a 75 watt bulb

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17. On the gemstone globes, which stones are used?

  • Abalone Shell
  • Mongolian White Jade
  • Amethyst
  • Mother of Pearl
  • Aphrizite
  • Phoenix Jade
  • Belioculas Onyx
  • Picture Jasper
  • Black Spotted Jade
  • Purple Quartz
  • Chrysolithos
  • Red Jade
  • Coral
  • Red Spotted Jade
  • Green Jade
  • South African Jade
  • Green Jasper
  • Spotted Jade
  • Lapis
  • Tiger Eye
  • Lapis Siphnos
  • Turquoise
  • Mongolian Jade
  • White Jade
  • Mongolian Red Spotted Jade
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    18. Can I use push pins with my press craft globe?

    No. Do not stick any object into your globe. It will damage the surface.

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    19. My globe ball does not stay upright. How can I fix this?

    There should be a plastic washer and a black rubber tip on each ear or post of the meridian. If you need these parts, please call Replogle Customer Service at (800) 275-4452.

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    20. How do I use the “Touch On” feature on my Replogle illuminated globe (20” or 32”)?

    The three levels of lighting are controlled by touching any part of the meridian ring with your fingertip.

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    21. How can I find out if my globe is an antique and how much it is worth?

    If you need help dating your globe ball, click on this link to go directly to Replogle Website: "How Old Is Your Globe".

    To learn about the value of your Replogle globe, contact Murray Hudson Antiquarian Books, Maps, Prints & Globes in Halls, TN. Visit their Website at Murray Hudson Antiquarian Website or call them at (800) 748-9946.

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    22. I heard about the Updatable Globe Program. What is it?

    Replogle Globes offers a program to help you keep your globe accurate and up-to-date. As a Replogle Globe owner, you can get 50% off the retail price of a new globe ball or ball and ring through the Replogle Updatable Globe Program. This program is available in Canada and in USA. To take advantage of it:

    • Write down your globe model (5-digit number on the globe packaging)
    • Also write down the month and date of purchase of your globe
    • Keep this information in a safe place
    • If a change occurs, you can request an update by contacting Replogle Globes at info@replogleglobes.com.

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    23. I have an old globe that is worn out. Can I get a replacement globe ball or stand?

    Before contacting Replogle Globes, please gather these informations:

    • Verify that your globe ball is a Replogle globe: check the crest located on the map in the Pacific Ocean above Hawaii. Then write down all the information printed inside that crest.
    • Your globe needs to be no more than 15 years old. If you need help dating your globe ball, click on this link to go directly to Replogle Website: "How Old Is Your Globe"
    • Write down whether your globe is vinyl (plastic) or press craft (paper).
    • Measure your globe's diameter in inches. You can measure the circumference of the equator and divide it by 3.1416.
    • Replacements are available for several 9”, 12”, 16”, 20”, and 32” globe balls.
    • Take at least two digital pictures: one of the globe ball with the stand and another photo showing a close-up of the South Pole.
    • E-mail Replogle Globes the answers to all the questions above with the pictures. Be sure to include your name, phone number and physical address.

    You should receive price quotes on replacement globe balls, but Replogle really needs to have all the above information!

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    Browse our Replogle Globes



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